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John H. Moser

John Henri Moser was born to John Moser and Elizabeth Flueman on September 13, 1876, in Wabern, Switzerland. Of seven children in the family, John Henri was the fifth. At an early age he dropped the name John and went by the name Henri.

Moser enrolled at the Utah State Agriculture College (U.S.A.C.). He initially registered in the School of Engineering, but after some persuasion from Professor Stoddare, Henri changed his studies to art. Moser also studied at the Calorose, Delecluse Academy in Paris, France.

Henri Moser proved his talent and ability with each of his creations. He received numerous awards and exhibited throughout the country. Henri Moser has forever contributed to the art and history of Utah. His impact will be felt for generations to come.

Biography adapted from Springville Museum of Art.

John Henri Moser was born to John Moser and Elizabeth Flueman on September 13, 1876, in Wabern, Switzerland. Of seven children in the family, John Henri was the fifth. At an early age he dropped the name John and went by the name Henri.

In 1881, his family moved to Bern, Switzerland, where his father pursued stone cutting as a career and where Henri first attended school. His early love of painting and drawing became evident as he was constantly chastised for sketching in class. One teacher even beat his hands until blistered for such behavior in her class. However, even this experience could not sway him from his love of art.

Some years later, the Moser family became converts to the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In 1888, the family emigrated to America and crossed the plains in a covered wagon. They settled first in Payson, Utah, and later moved to Logan, Utah. It was in Logan that Henri began to work for the Diem family on their farm. A short while later, he began working in a printing shop in Enterprise, Utah: a job that was to last for the next ten years.

While working at the printing shop, Moser decided to further his formal education. He went to work in the Gill Edge Mine in Montana to earn money for school. After saving the required funds, Henri returned to Logan and enrolled in the Utah State Agriculture College (U.S.A.C.). He initially registered in the School of Engineering, but after some persuasion from Professor Stoddare, Henri changed his studies to art.

On September 13, 1905, Henri married Aldina Wurden and later had six sons and daughters with her. They continued to live in Logan where Henri pursued his studies along with Alma B. Wright at Brigham Young College. In 1910, Dr. John A. Widstoe, President of Utah State Agriculture College, granted Henri a loan that allowed Henri to travel to Paris, France. In Paris, Henri enrolled at Calorose, Delecluse Academy and studied with Marvel Berenaur. He continued his studies at Carri and Miller. During this time, Henri became acquainted with Pablo Picasso. Henri later said of Picasso, "I know him well, he painted beautiful things then. Today he paints to advertise himself and laughs at the credulous public. He has wonderful talent and ability."

In 1911, Moser returned to the United States to teach at the U.S.A.C.. He later taught at the Agricultural College in Cedar City before moving to Idaho to homestead land in Malad. He ranched and painted there for the next eight years.

Henri Moser proved his talent and ability with each of his creations. He received numerous awards and exhibited throughout the country. Henri Moser has forever contributed to the art and history of Utah. His impact will be felt for generations to come.

Biography courtesy Springville Museum of Art.

Newspaper Articles

"Coming Up: Visual Arts." The Salt Lake Tribune, September 22, 1996.

"Sacred landscapes." The Deseret News, June 28, 1998.

"Special Showing And Sale Feature Paintings By Early Utah Artists." The Deseret News, September 22, 1996.

Books

Dawdy, Doris. Artists of the American West: A Biographical Dictionary. Chicago, IL: Sage Books, 1990.

Dunbier, Lonnie Pierson, ed. The Artists Bluebook: 29,000 North American Artists. Scottsdale, AZ: AskART.com, 2003.

Falk, Peter Hastings. Who Was Who in American Art, 1564-1975: 400 Years of Artists in America. Madison, CT: Sound View Press, 1999.

Gerdts, William H. Art Across America: Two Centuries of Regional Painting, 1710-1920. New York, NY: Abbeville Press, 1990.

Haseltine, James L. 100 Years of Utah Painting: Selected Works from the 1840s to the 1940s. Salt Lake City, UT: Salt Lake Arts Center, 1965.

Olpin, Robert S., William C. Seifrit, Vern G. Swanson. Artists of Utah. Salt Lake City, UT: Gibbs Smith Publisher, 1999.

Swanson, Vern G., Robert S. Olpin, and William C. Seifrit. Utah Art. Layton, UT: Peregrine Smith Books, 1992.

Samuels, Peggy and Harold Samuels. The Illustrated Biographical Encyclopedia of Artists of the American West. Garden City, NY: Doubleday, 1976.

Swanson, Vern G., Robert S. Olpin, Donna Poulton, and Janie Rogers. 150 Years Survey Utah Art, Utah Artists. Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Publisher, 2001.

Swanson, Vern G., Robert S. Olpin, William C. Seifrit. Utah Painting and Sculpture. Layton, UT: Gibbs Smith Publisher, 1991.

 Last Modified 4/23/14